Can you still pretend you are a male feminist when you kill a woman?

YouTube personality and male feminist Aleksandr Kolpakov (a.k.a. Russian Deadpool) is sitting in a Colorado jail cell awaiting trial for second-degree murder. Kolpakov shot girlfriend and YouTube channel co-host Heather Anable in the neck and chest, killing her.

If you’ve never heard of Russian Deadpool before now, I envy you. I’m only aware of him because he was the co-moderator of a “debate” between Carl Benjamin (a.k.a. Sargon of Akkad) and Kristi Winters. The debate was held on Kolpakov and Anable’s YouTube channel, The Skeptic Feminist.

Before you try to watch the debate, I recommend brewing a pot of strong coffee and snorting some crushed up NoDoz.

I tried to watch the debate shortly after it happened, but I found it too boring to watch. The topic was Is Feminism Good for the World. Kristi was debating for the affirmative, Carl was debating for the negative. My favorite part was the anime poster behind the two moderators. I don’t know a lot about formal debate, by I would think one of the first things you would want to do is get rid of decor that doesn’t have anything to do with the subject. How hard is it to take down an anime poster?

Is Aleksandr Kolpakov still a feminist?

If you’re sitting in a jail cell awaiting trial for murdering a woman, can you still call yourself a male feminist?  I don’t think so. I think killing a woman means an automatic expulsion from the male feminist club. There are many types of feminists practicing many types of feminism, but I’ve got to think a common belief all feminists share is the belief that killing a defenseless woman is wrong.

Kolpakov still believes he’s a feminist. He’s even still using the Russian Deadpool pseudonym. He’s been corresponding with feminist YouTuber Jenny McDermott. She’s made videos about their correspondence. In the first video, she held up a letter he wrote to her and you can clearly see where he signed it as “Aleksandr Kolpakov AKA Russian Deadpool.”

What a dirt bag. When you shoot and kill someone, maybe you should retire the YouTube username based on a comic book character who shoots people. I imagine Marvel Comics isn’t too happy to have their intellectual property associated with someone like Aleksandr Kolpakov. This case will most likely get more publicity when he goes on trial. Evidently Kolpakov is blaming his actions on poisoned psychedelic mushrooms, so I’m sure the case will have lots and lots of needless drama. If Aleksandr Kolpakov has any honor, he’d plead guilty and spare Heather Anable’s family the ordeal of a trial.

I wouldn’t be surprised if the trial shows up as a Dateline episode.

Sprint vs. RockstarFlipper

Casey Parris, known on YouTube as RockstarFlipper, publishes videos about his eBay business. He buys clothing and other things at Goodwill, yard sales, pawn shops, etc. and then sells them on eBay for a profit. He appears to be good at selling things on eBay. He famously drives a BMW i8 sportscar, an automobile that costs around $150,000. According to his videos, he drives this high-performance, luxury vehicle to yard sales and Goodwill, in pursuit of his treasures to sell on eBay.

Wil Wheaton’s TableTop season four

I found this schedule on Reddit for the fourth season of “geek icon” Wil Wheaton’s TableTop. It’s interesting in that each episode has two release dates. Most episodes will premiere on the paid subscription streaming service Alpha. Then, two or three months later, they will publish the episodes on YouTube.

The first two episodes of TableTop season four premiered on YouTube as well as on Alpha.

Wil Wheaton's TableTop season four - Bent Corner

If you want to watch Wil Wheaton and his crew of wannabe D-listers play the Fate: Core System roleplaying game system today, you’ll have to pay for the privilege. That, or wait almost three months to watch it for free on YouTube.

Alpha is only five bucks a month, but that’s five dollars too much. Watching an episode of TableTop for free on YouTube is too much. If something has social justice warrior Wil Wheaton in it, I will pay money not to watch it.

Wil Wheaton is a talentless dick. He pretends to not only be a nerd, but he promotes himself to be the king of the nerds. If Wil Wheaton was a nerd, he never would have begged to leave Star Trek: The Next Generation. A true nerd would never want to get off a popular Star Trek TV show. A real nerd would fight like a badger to stay on a Star Trek TV show.

From his website:

Here’s the absolute truth why I left Star Trek. I left Star Trek because it was seriously interfering with my career in feature films. I was in a situation where I was constantly having to pass on really good movie roles because I was on the series. I had a film career before Star Trek. People knew me before Star Trek. As a matter of fact, at Comic Con, a lot of people came up to me and said, “I started watching Star Trek because you were on it and I was fan of yours from Stand By Me and I stopped watching it after you left.” I had a lot of people say that to me.

I would bet $100 nobody at Comic-Con ever told Wil Wheaton they starting watching Star Trek: The Next Generation because he was on it. The same goes for someone at Comic-Con saying they stopped watching it because he left. It would be strange for someone to walk up to him at a grocery store and say this. Am I supposed to believe “a lot of people” at Comic-Con did this?

No, I’m not buying it.

After Wil Wheaton left Star Trek: The Next Generation, his movie career went… nowhere. He’s a former child actor who can’t get any type of real acting work as an adult unless he’s playing himself. For example, The Big Bang Theory. Wil Wheaton is a reoccurring character on the show. He plays himself.

Wil Wheaton is an actor who cannot act. He compensates for this personal deficiency by reinventing himself as some sort of geek icon, a king of all nerds. We’re supposed to believe that any sort of nerd, let alone a king of all nerds, would beg, whine, and demand to be released from a TV show with the words Star and Trek in the title.

Thanks, but no thanks.

Wil Wheaton blames ‘Tabletop’ producer for errors

Former child actor Wil Wheaton hosts a YouTube show called Tabletop. The show features Wheaton and three or four guests playing a board game, the type of specialty board game one might buy at a specialty game store. In the videos, you see Wheaton and his guests, usually D-list celebrities, playing the game, presumably correctly.

I’ve only watched a few of the episodes. I got the impression the show was meant to be both entertaining and educational. As it turns out, Tabletop may not be as educational as I first believed. It would seem Wheaton and his guests haven’t been playing these games correctly, and Internet people have begun calling him out on it.

I hate when that happens.

Wil Wheaton addressed this criticism this past week on his blog. He admitted that the third and current season of Tabletop had gotten many things wrong. He placed the blame on an unnamed former producer.

From Wil Wheaton’s blog:

I am furious, I am embarrassed, and I need to put there here so I can just refer to it when this almost certainly happens again this season:

We had a producer whose primary job was to make sure we knew the rules to the games and played correctly. I trusted this producer to be on top of these things, and I trusted this producer to ensure that we played the games properly.

For the first two seasons, this producer did a fantastic job. A couple mistakes got through, but it wasn’t a big deal. Everyone makes a mistake now and then, and the show has always been more about the fun of playing the games than anything else. But something happened in the third season. I don’t know if this producer was careless, overwhelmed, didn’t care as deeply as previous seasons, or just didn’t do the same amount of preparation that was done for the first two seasons. I don’t know why this producer failed to do the most important part of the job so many times this season, but I’m pretty fucking pissed off that the person I trusted to make sure we played the games correctly let me down. I trusted this producer so completely, I spent my time and my energy on other aspects of production, instead of diligently reviewing the rules before every game like I’d done the first two seasons. I feel really, really awful about this. I feel embarrassed by this.

What Wil Wheaton should feel embarrassed about is his blog post. When I first read it, I honestly thought it was a spoof. He didn’t take any personal responsibility until the eighth paragraph. Even then, he implied his failure was not making sure they were playing the games correctly and by the rules, but was trusting that the unnamed producer was doing their job.

Who is the unnamed producer?

Wil Wheaton never identified the guilty producer by name, but it’s not too hard to figure out who he was referring to. Wikipedia lists six people who produce the show. They are Sheri Bryant, Felicia Day, Kim Evey, Wil Wheaton, Adam Lawson, and Boyan Radakovich. Of these six people, only one has ever been identified by Wheaton in the past as being an associate producer and the games guru.

His name is Boyan Radakovich

I found Boyan Radakovich on Twitter. He posted the following tweet on June 19, four days after Wheaton’s blog post:


Radakovich didn’t come out and admit he was the unnamed producer Wheaton threw under the bus, but it’s pretty clear from the ensuing comments made by other people that he’s the unnamed producer. He certainly didn’t correct anyone when they referred to Wil Wheaton.

What Wil Wheaton should do

If Wil Wheaton doesn’t know how to play a board game he’s featuring on his show, the board game he pretends to know everything about, he should have an actual expert for that board game on set to act as that episode’s technical advisor. Having one person whose primary responsibility it is to be the expert on every board game being played, seems like a massive recipe for disaster.

No one person can be an expert on every board game. To assume otherwise is stupid.