Toys R Us 1957 – 2018

Toys R Us is going out of business. They owe more money to creditors than what they have and have declared bankruptcy. I keep reading that Toys R Us will be liquidating their current inventory with massive sales. The science fiction blog io9 said that sale was to begin yesterday. That didn’t happen.

I went to the Hagerstown Toys R Us yesterday and although the shelves were looking quite bare, there wasn’t a massive sale going on.

I’ve got my eyes on an Iron Man statue that normally costs $39.99. I have a Spider-Man statue from the same line that I was able to get for only $6.99 earlier at Toys R Us.

One of the byproducts of paying only $6.99 for a statue that normally costs $39.99 is that you don’t want to pay for retail for one ever again. You get spoiled.

The Hagerstown Toys R Us has one of the Iron Man statues in stock, but it’s $39.99 with a buy one, buy another at 40 percent off. Since they only have one, it makes that gimmick sale even worse than normal.

I have a lot of good memories associated with Toys R Us. Not as a child, but as an adult who has collected a lot of stupid stuff over the years.

It began with Playmates Star Trek: The Next Generation action figures. I was in the Air Force stationed in upstate New York and my boss was collecting them. He asked me to be on the lookout for a Deanna Troi for him. Since she was a girl, toy companies made less of them since it was a toy line for boys.

Deanna Troi, the lady that started it all.

It got to be fun looking for her. I finally got her for him at a KB Toys in a “black” mall in Los Angeles when I was home on leave. My ex-wife and I were the only white people in the entire mall. I didn’t even notice until my ex-wife pointed it out. If memory serves, she cared about things like that.

I gave my boss the Deanna Troi figure when I got back and he was able to then finish his collection. I missed looking for her, so I started collecting them myself.

From collecting Playmates Star Trek: The Next Generation action figures, I moved over to collecting Star Wars: The Power of the Force figures when they were released in 1995.

I then got into collecting sports-related Kenner Starting Lineup figures. I was into collecting those in a very serious way. I made many a trip to Toys R Us, KB Toys, Kmart, Walmart, and anywhere else I thought would stock them. Once they hit the pegs, they usually went pretty quickly.

I even started and maintained a Majordomo message email list for fellow collectors of Kenner Starting Lineup figures. It resulted in my very first online death threat. A member of the list got mad about something and decided to show his frustration by threatening me with death.

I still collect Hot Wheels cars off and on. I take a look at die-cast cars when we go to Walmart or Target. Sometimes I’ll pick up a car I like, but my interest in the toy cars is nothing too serious. They’re usually less than a dollar each, so it’s easy to pick one up if I see something I like.

I think I’ll miss Toys R Us, not for anything it can provide today, but for what it was able to provide before.

Wil Wheaton’s TableTop season four

I found this schedule on Reddit for the fourth season of “geek icon” Wil Wheaton’s TableTop. It’s interesting in that each episode has two release dates. Most episodes will premiere on the paid subscription streaming service Alpha. Then, two or three months later, they will publish the episodes on YouTube.

The first two episodes of TableTop season four premiered on YouTube as well as on Alpha.

Wil Wheaton's TableTop season four - Bent Corner

If you want to watch Wil Wheaton and his crew of wannabe D-listers play the Fate: Core System roleplaying game system today, you’ll have to pay for the privilege. That, or wait almost three months to watch it for free on YouTube.

Alpha is only five bucks a month, but that’s five dollars too much. Watching an episode of TableTop for free on YouTube is too much. If something has social justice warrior Wil Wheaton in it, I will pay money not to watch it.

Wil Wheaton is a talentless dick. He pretends to not only be a nerd, but he promotes himself to be the king of the nerds. If Wil Wheaton was a nerd, he never would have begged to leave Star Trek: The Next Generation. A true nerd would never want to get off a popular Star Trek TV show. A real nerd would fight like a badger to stay on a Star Trek TV show.

From his website:

Here’s the absolute truth why I left Star Trek. I left Star Trek because it was seriously interfering with my career in feature films. I was in a situation where I was constantly having to pass on really good movie roles because I was on the series. I had a film career before Star Trek. People knew me before Star Trek. As a matter of fact, at Comic Con, a lot of people came up to me and said, “I started watching Star Trek because you were on it and I was fan of yours from Stand By Me and I stopped watching it after you left.” I had a lot of people say that to me.

I would bet $100 nobody at Comic-Con ever told Wil Wheaton they starting watching Star Trek: The Next Generation because he was on it. The same goes for someone at Comic-Con saying they stopped watching it because he left. It would be strange for someone to walk up to him at a grocery store and say this. Am I supposed to believe “a lot of people” at Comic-Con did this?

No, I’m not buying it.

After Wil Wheaton left Star Trek: The Next Generation, his movie career went… nowhere. He’s a former child actor who can’t get any type of real acting work as an adult unless he’s playing himself. For example, The Big Bang Theory. Wil Wheaton is a reoccurring character on the show. He plays himself.

Wil Wheaton is an actor who cannot act. He compensates for this personal deficiency by reinventing himself as some sort of geek icon, a king of all nerds. We’re supposed to believe that any sort of nerd, let alone a king of all nerds, would beg, whine, and demand to be released from a TV show with the words Star and Trek in the title.

Thanks, but no thanks.