Nintendo Switch goes live… sort of

Nintendo’s newest console/handheld gaming system Nintendo Switch was released last night for retail sale. People were lined up for hours before the midnight release in hopes of scoring the chance to pay $299.00 for a system.

Nintendo’s website for buying a Switch has links to retailers:

Amazon – Sold Out. They have a link to a list of scalped Nintendo Switch units starting at $429.95 for the gray unit and $445 for the more colorful blue and neon red model.

Best Buy – Sold out. No links to scalped Nintendo Switch units.

GameStop – Sold out. No links to scalped Nintendo Switch units.

Target – Sold out. No links to scalped Nintendo Switch units.

Walmart – When you click on Nintendo’s link for Walmart, it takes you directly to their scalper page. I’m assuming this means Walmart is completely sold out, but it’s not very clear. The scalped units start at $599.99 and go up from there.

Toys R Us – Out of stock. No links to scalped Nintendo Switch units.

I think Amazon and Walmart are acting unethically by linking to “third-party” sellers of Nintendo Switch units. Amazon and Walmart both get a cut of the purchase price when a scalper sells a Nintendo Switch through them. In fact, they probably make more money off each Nintendo Switch sale through a scalper than they do from their own retail stock.

Amazon and Walmart can’t sell the Nintendo Switch for more than $299.99. This price is locked in by Nintendo. There’s no such limit when it comes to their scalper partners. With them, the sky’s the limit.

I don’t want a Nintendo Switch. The graphics on the TV screen look terrible. If I wanted to play a console game, I’d rather play the PlayStation 4 or the Xbox One. If I wanted to play a handheld game, I’d rather play the Nintendo 3DS or my iPad.

The Swiss Army Knife does everything, except do any one thing well.

I’m not a fan of the multi-purpose design philosophy. A Swiss Army Knife is a terrible pocket knife. It’s too big to fit comfortable in a pocket and the various blades and tools are never as good as the single-purpose equivalent.

The same thing applies to a gaming system.

 

Author: Rick Rottman

This is my personal blog. It's where I write about things when I feel like it.

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