Tonight is Game 7 of the World Series

The All-Star Game deciding home-field advantage in the World Series has got to be the most stupid rule in baseball. Considering that baseball is a game full of stupid rules, that’s saying something.

The Chicago Cubs (103-58) and the Clevland Indians (94-67) face off tonight in a World Series Game 7. Even though the Cubs won nine more games than the Indians, they don’t have home field advantage. Because the American League beat the National League in the 2016 All-Star Game, the Indians have home field advantage.

The All-Star Game deciding home-field advantage in the World Series has got to be the most stupid rule in baseball. Considering that baseball is a game full of stupid rules, that’s saying something.

The All-Star Game use to be just a fun exhibition game between players that almost never played against each other. The advent of interleague play ruined all that. Now teams play teams in the other league every day. For example, the American League Baltimore Orioles play the National League Washington Nationals six times a year because both teams are geographic “rivals.” They aren’t rivals. We went to an Orioles game in Washington a few years ago and not only were there about an equal amount of fans from both teams, but a lot of people were also wearing both Orioles and Nationals gear. For instance, an Orioles jersey with a Nationals hat.

Both interleague play and the All-Star Game deciding home-field advantage in the World Series was the doing of one man: former Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig.

Bud Selig
Bud Selig

Selig was an awful commissioner. He was at the helm during the 1994 player’s strike. He was also in charge during the so-called steroid era. The idea that his stupid ideas would remain in effect even after leaving the commissioner’s office seems dumb.

Personally, I don’t mind interleague play, but it does make the Word Series a bit anti-climatic when one team for the National League and one team from the American League face off to decide which team is the world’s best. The Word Series use to be exciting for no other reason then you would get to see teams play each other that you never got to see play against each other.

The Chicago Cubs won 103 games this season. That’s tough to do. Every year, one team wins the World Series.  Usually, no team wins  100 games in a season. The idea that the Cubs could win 103 games and then have to play Game 7 of the World Series in Cleveland in front of Indian fans seems all sorts of wrong. The Cubs should be able to play tonight at Wrigley in front of Cubs fans.

Usually, under normal circumstances, I wouldn’t care who wins this Word Series. I don’t hate either team or even more importantly, I don’t hate the fans of either team. Typically a match-up like this would invoke nothing but neutrality within my heart. Because the Cubs and their fans are getting jobbed with home field advantage, I want the Cubs to win.

No team that wins 103 games in a season should be forced to play Game 7 of the Word Series on the road unless the other team somehow won 104 games. That didn’t happen, so I’m rooting for the Cubs.

Baltimore Orioles Chris Davis suspended 25 games for taking amphetamines

Baltimore Orioles first baseman Chris Davis was suspended by Major League Baseball for testing positive for amphetamines.

Davis released the following statement:

I apologize to my teammates, coaches, the Orioles organization and especially the fans. I made a mistake by taking Adderall. I had permission to use it in the past, but do not have a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) this year. I accept my punishment and will begin serving my suspension immediately.

Adderall? That’s a drug for kids who have ADHD. Davis seems more than happy to sit for 25 games. I almost get the impression that he’s just glad he didn’t get caught for taking something else.

A therapeutic use exemption (TUE) is something covered in the Joint Drug Agreement between MLB and the Major League Baseball Players Association. It essentially allows a player to take a banned substance if they have a doctor’s note and they promise, cross their heart hope to die, that what they’re taking isn’t being taken to give them a competitive edge. MLB allowed Alex Rodriguez to use performance enhancers before they didn’t allow him to use them, and he simply kept on using them.

chris_davis

I assume from Davis’ statement that he was probably using amphetamines with the league’s blessing last year when he hit 53 home runs and batted in 138 runs.

For having such gaudy numbers last year, Davis was having a terrible season this year. He was hitting only .196, but he hit 26 home runs and hit 72 runs batted in. He also had 173 strkeouts, second most in MLB.

MLB kills the ‘transfer rule’

Major League Baseball announced on Friday that effective immediately, they were doing away with the new transfer rule. MLB had earlier clarified that the existing rule on catching the ball would be interpreted going into the 2014 season that if the fielder fails to transfer the ball properly from his glove to his throwing hand, the catch is not a catch, and the runner is safe. The interpretation was referred to as the transfer rule.

This is what it has always said in Section 2 of the Major League Baseball rulebook:

A CATCH is the act of a fielder in getting secure possession in his hand or glove of a ball in flight and firmly holding it; providing he does not use his cap, protector, pocket or any other part of his uniform in getting possession. It is not a catch, however, if simultaneously or immediately following his contact with the ball, he collides with a player, or with a wall, or if he falls down, and as a result of such collision or falling, drops the ball. It is not a catch if a fielder touches a fly ball which then hits a member of the offensive team or an umpire and then is caught by another defensive player. If the fielder has made the catch and drops the ball while in the act of making a throw following the catch, the ball shall be adjudged to have been caught. In establishing the validity of the catch, the fielder shall hold the ball long enough to prove that he has complete control of the ball and that his release of the ball is voluntary and intentional.

I don’t understand how you can read the rule and determine that it’s not a catch if you drop the ball while taking it out of your glove. The two events, the catch and the subsequent throw, are independent of one another. The Baltimore Orioles lost a game against the Boston Red Sox because of this stupid interpretation. I’m sure other teams were robbed because of it too.

The transfer rule was stupid. I’m glad to see that they killed it.