How dare the guys at Dropbox try to use a soccer field they reserved

Employees from Dropbox, a San Fransisco-based company that provides a popular file hosting service, reserved a soccer field in a local city park. They paid $27 for an hour of soccer time.

When they showed up to play real football during their allotted time, they found the field already in use by neighborhood youths in a pick-up soccer game. The guys from Dropbox tried to get the pick-up players to leave the field.

One of the youths videoed part of the exchange with the Dropbox guys:


My favorite part of the video is when one of the men refusing to leave the field asks one of the Dropbox guys, in broken English, to see his papers.

How ironic.

The problem is that the neighborhood youths didn’t recognize the concept of reserving the field, even though there’s a sign posted at the park that clearly states permit holders have priority over non-permit holders:

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The guys from Dropbox are being crucified online. They’ve been portrayed as entitled, gentrifying douchebags. I don’t understand how they’re the bad guys. The people refusing to leave the field are the ones who acted entitled. They believed they had a right to something even though they hadn’t paid anything for it, while the people who paid for it, were being denied access.

Like it or not, we live in the world where things cost money. If I were Conor, the guy who paid the city of San Fransisco $27 for the permit, I’d be calling my credit card company and filing a chargeback. A link to the video is all the documentation I’d need.

Author: Rick Rottman

I’m from California. I live in Maryland. I enjoy Batman, rooting against your favorite sports team, and the musical stylings of Enya. If you'd like to know more about me, check out my About page.

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