Colin Kaepernick and his peaceful protest

From CNN’s LZ Granderson:

Now that the dust surrounding Kaepernick’s departure from the NFL has settled, we’re able to have a more substantive conversation about some of the controversial topics that his peaceful protest against oppression of people of color during the national anthem sparked: freedom of speech and patriotism.

I don’t think anything connected to Kaepernick’s departure from the NFL has settled. On the contrary, the last I read it’s now going to arbitration.

Kaepernick chose a time stage his peaceful protest when everyone else at the stadium was standing and showing respect. I found his peaceful protest to be extremely rude, much like I would an atheist who refused to stand during a prayer at a Catholic funeral. If Kaepernick hates America so much for its oppression of people of color, he should do it on his own time, not when everyone else is showing respect.

If he thinks America is so bad for people of color, what country does he think they would have it any better? I can think of no better country than the United States for people of any color to live in. Kaepernick must agree because although he has more than enough money to move anywhere in the world, he chooses to live in the United States of America.

I judge a man by the t-shirts he wears

It’s hard to believe Kaepernick is against the oppression of people of color when he wore a t-shirt honoring the murderous communist known as Fidel Castro.

Colin Kaepernick and his ridiculous peaceful protest - Bent Corner
Colin Kaepernick wearing a Fidel Castro Malcolm X t-shirt.

Wearing a Fidel Castro t-shirt is like wearing an Adolf Hitler t-shirt. When it comes to the oppression of people of color, Castro was a bonified champion of it.

Burning Nike products is also a peaceful protest

Colin Kaepernick and his ridiculous peaceful protest - Bent Corner

Since Nike announced it was using Colin Kaepernick in its new “Just Do it” ad campaign, people have posted photos and videos showing the burning of their Nike shoes and other Nike items. People who side with Kaepernick and his right to peaceful protest are having a good laugh over this. Don’t they understand the people doing this are engaging in their own peaceful protest?

If I didn’t know better, I’d think people who side with Kaepernick do so not because they’re supporters of free speech, but because they also hate America, the police, daylight savings time, or whatever else Kaepernick is against. They only support free speech when it’s aligned with their own thoughts and opinions.

I totally understand why people are burning their Nike products. On the Tuesday episode of NPR’s Up First, the host more than implied people who are against Nike using Kaepernick in their ad campaign don’t matter to Nike because they don’t buy Nike products. That’s clearly not true when you see people burning their Nike stuff. I have a closet full of Nike products. I’m not planning on burning any of it, but I don’t plan on wearing any of it either. It will probably all go into a box in the attic.

I certainly won’t buy any Nike merchandise in the future.  Not anymore.

The people burning their Nike gear are proving they bought Nike gear in the past. They’re proving they will never wear any of it again. Nobody can accuse them of not being Nike customers.

Thank God for Adidas and Under Armour

I’ll probably stick to Adidas products. As a German company, I think they’re less inclined to get involved with American social justice foolishness. They probably just want to focus on making better products. There’s also Under Armour. They’re located here in Maryland and they not only make athletic gear, they also make clothing for police and military members. I doubt they would ever associate with someone who dishonors flag and country the way Kaepernick does.

It’s not like I don’t have choices. I just wish Nike had taken people like me into consideration before taking such a controversial stand. Something tells me they didn’t do that. I don’t have a lot of money as Colin Kaepernick does. Not wearing any of my Nike merchandise because the company insists on going in an-ill-thought out controversial direction, affects me financially. My love of Nike products isn’t nearly as strong as my love of country.

Author: Rick Rottman

My name is Rick Rottman and I live in Maryland. This is my blog. If you'd like to know more about me, check out my About page.

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