The Baltimore Sun wants to protect me from ‘fake’ news?

I got an email from The Baltimore Sun with a special offer. The title of the email was, “2017 resolution: No more fake news! Only read trusted stories, $1.25 a week for a year.” In the body of the email was the following image:

We believe tall tales belong in libraries? Don’t they know that lots of people read The Baltimore Sun in libraries? When I was a kid, I liked going to the library to read newspapers and magazines. It was long before libraries became official unofficial daytime homeless shelters that they are today. At least the public library in Hagerstown is. I liked reading the newspapers at the library because they put them on long wooden poles. It made for a better, neater reading experience.

What I find hilarious with something like this is that the biggest propagator of “fake news” is the online version of traditional mainstream news media. For example, the following appears on the front page of The Baltimore Sun website:

The Baltimore Sun wants to protect me from 'fake' news? - Bent Corner

Really? What Angie Harmon looks like now is “insane”? What exactly does a person have to look like to be characterized as insane? Is she strapped to a special dolly wearing a no-bite facemask like Anthony Hopkins in Silence of the Lambs? That’s what it looks like to me when someone looks insane.

The Baltimore Sun wants to protect me from 'fake' news? - Bent Corner
Angie Harmon is that you?

Unless Angie Harmon now looks Hopkins in the above photo, the paid post on the front page of The Baltimore Sun website is highly misleading. I would even say that the paid post is fake. It’s not even an ad for Your Daily Dish. Not really. It’s a post like other posts on The Baltimore Sun, but what sets it apart from the others is that it’s a paid post.

Even a Jimmy Buffett fan can tell you that the Angie Harmon post is an ad, but The Baltimore Sun is pretending that it’s not an ad, they’re pretending that it’s a post.

Is Angie Harmon even financially compensated for having her image used in a paid advertisement? If it were an actual pure ad, she would need to agree to have her likeness used and whoever placed the ad would need to compensate her financially. If her photo appears in a post, she wouldn’t need to sign off on her likeness used, nor would the newspaper need to compensate her.

It’s stuff like this that gives me zero faith in the mainstream news media.

Author: Rick Rottman

This is my personal blog. It's where I write about things when I feel like it.

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